February 20 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Scientists at the University of Sheffield in the UK released a study that suggests using granulated basaltic rocks from volcanic eruptions could provide several positive benefits for agriculture and the climate. The benefits include improving soil fertility, cutting amounts of pesticides needed, and increasing carbon sequestration. [CleanTechnica]
Spreading basaltic rock

Spreading basaltic rock

  • The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia’s premier research organization, announced a new form of graphene it says can filter polluted water and make it drinkable in one step. It is a combination of graphene film and nanometer-size channels that allow water to pass but block pollutants. [CleanTechnica]
  • The energy taxes that are currently in place in the world’s top economies are not extensive enough to aid in the mitigation of anthropogenic climate change to a large degree, a study said. The study from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development looked at energy taxes in 42 different OECD and G20 economies. [CleanTechnica]
  • A new report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis shows that major power systems can be able to cope well with increasing shares of intermittent renewables. The study says that increased generation of renewable resources does not make the grid less reliable or compromise the security of supply. [Business News Americas]
  • Solar manufacturer SunPower, based in California, reported tepid results in its Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2017 results last week. Revenues were down 35% year-over-year and First Quarter and Full Year 2018 revenues well below expectations. SunPower is still in the early days of looking to make the best of the solar tariff ruling. [CleanTechnica]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

 

February 20 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

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February 20 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Scientists at the University of Sheffield in the UK released a study that suggests using granulated basaltic rocks from volcanic eruptions could provide several positive benefits for agriculture and the climate. The benefits include improving soil fertility, cutting amounts of pesticides needed, and increasing carbon sequestration. [CleanTechnica]
Spreading basaltic rock

Spreading basaltic rock

  • The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia’s premier research organization, announced a new form of graphene it says can filter polluted water and make it drinkable in one step. It is a combination of graphene film and nanometer-size channels that allow water to pass but block pollutants. [CleanTechnica]
  • The energy taxes that are currently in place in the world’s top economies are not extensive enough to aid in the mitigation of anthropogenic climate change to a large degree, a study said. The study from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development looked at energy taxes in 42 different OECD and G20 economies. [CleanTechnica]
  • A new report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis shows that major power systems can be able to cope well with increasing shares of intermittent renewables. The study says that increased generation of renewable resources does not make the grid less reliable or compromise the security of supply. [Business News Americas]
  • Solar manufacturer SunPower, based in California, reported tepid results in its Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2017 results last week. Revenues were down 35% year-over-year and First Quarter and Full Year 2018 revenues well below expectations. SunPower is still in the early days of looking to make the best of the solar tariff ruling. [CleanTechnica]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

 

February 20 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

February 19 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Meet the new ‘renewable superpowers’” • A world powered by renewable energy will prize a very different set of resources than we do today. Which countries hold the key to unlocking wind and solar energy, and how will this shake up the world order? University of Swansea’s Andrew Barron discusses some of the issues. [eco-business.com]
Child looking at wind turbines (Image: Ben Paulos, CC BY 2.0)

Child looking at wind turbines (Image: Ben Paulos, CC BY 2.0)

  • “La Plata Electric Association grapples with era of change” • Texas utility LPEA is locked into a contract for the next 30 years with its electricity provider, Tri-State. Tri-State generates most of its electricity by burning coal and only promises to increase prices. Expensive and dirty power is not what most LPEA members want. [The Durango Herald]
  • While the rest of the world is warming, one part of the US is getting colder. The Corn Belt has seen summer temperatures drop 1°C (1.8°F) while rainfall increased by 35%. According to research published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, this time it is agricultural production, not greenhouse gases, that is to blame. [IFLScience]
  • “Tell the EPA: The economic cost of repealing the Clean Power Plan is just too high” • Repealing the CPP would deny Americans the opportunity to create 560,000 jobs and add $52 billion in economic value. That is in addition to the more than 3 million clean energy jobs in the US already, a nonpartisan environmental business group’s report says. [Kansas City Star]
  • President Donald Trump’s 2019 budget request would slash funding for farm bill conservation programs by about $13 billion over 10 years, on top of cuts already sustained in the 2014 farm bill. In a study, we found that it is highly uncertain whether the benefits these programs have produced can maintained with such cuts. [The Conversation]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

February 19 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

February 19 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Meet the new ‘renewable superpowers’” • A world powered by renewable energy will prize a very different set of resources than we do today. Which countries hold the key to unlocking wind and solar energy, and how will this shake up the world order? University of Swansea’s Andrew Barron discusses some of the issues. [eco-business.com]
Child looking at wind turbines (Image: Ben Paulos, CC BY 2.0)

Child looking at wind turbines (Image: Ben Paulos, CC BY 2.0)

  • “La Plata Electric Association grapples with era of change” • Texas utility LPEA is locked into a contract for the next 30 years with its electricity provider, Tri-State. Tri-State generates most of its electricity by burning coal and only promises to increase prices. Expensive and dirty power is not what most LPEA members want. [The Durango Herald]
  • While the rest of the world is warming, one part of the US is getting colder. The Corn Belt has seen summer temperatures drop 1°C (1.8°F) while rainfall increased by 35%. According to research published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, this time it is agricultural production, not greenhouse gases, that is to blame. [IFLScience]
  • “Tell the EPA: The economic cost of repealing the Clean Power Plan is just too high” • Repealing the CPP would deny Americans the opportunity to create 560,000 jobs and add $52 billion in economic value. That is in addition to the more than 3 million clean energy jobs in the US already, a nonpartisan environmental business group’s report says. [Kansas City Star]
  • President Donald Trump’s 2019 budget request would slash funding for farm bill conservation programs by about $13 billion over 10 years, on top of cuts already sustained in the 2014 farm bill. In a study, we found that it is highly uncertain whether the benefits these programs have produced can maintained with such cuts. [The Conversation]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

February 19 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

February 18 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “With the US pursuing fossil fuels, alternative, renewable forms of energy could be an even bigger boon to China” • While President Donald Trump’s administration has moved to cut the US government’s clean energy budgets by up to 70%, China has been steadily moving in the opposite direction by exploring alternatives. [Jefferson Public Radio]
Goldwind wind farm (Photo: Pzavislak, Wikimedia Commons)

Goldwind wind farm in China (Photo: Pzavislak, Wikimedia Commons)

  • EPA chief Scott Pruitt staged a quiet visit to Massachusetts, along Federal Energy Regulatory Commission member Neal Chaterjee. The two toured the Northfield Mountain Generating Station pumped storage facility in Northfield. The visit was one day before FERC finalized new rules to benefit energy storage facilities. [MassLive.com]
  • Australia currently mines the majority of the world’s lithium and also mines all of the minerals needed to make batteries on its home soil, but a report by Future Smart Strategies warns that a failure to look beyond this natural advantage, to opportunities that lie further down the supply chain, could cost the nation dearly. [CleanTechnica]
  • After Massachusetts chose a $950 million project headed by Maine utility Central Maine Power as its backup option to bring Canadian power to their state, Maine Gov Paul LePage’s energy czar said his boss would “push this right through” the rest of the permitting process that is handled by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection. [Maine Public]
  • With state officials eyeing $56 billion of wind farm projects off the American coastline, developers are worried the turbines will need to be stamped with a big “Made in the USA.” Most are made in Europe, but the states in the Northeast that are jumping into wind power are betting they can create their own wind turbine industry. [WatertownDailyTimes.com]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

February 18 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

February 18 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “With the US pursuing fossil fuels, alternative, renewable forms of energy could be an even bigger boon to China” • While President Donald Trump’s administration has moved to cut the US government’s clean energy budgets by up to 70%, China has been steadily moving in the opposite direction by exploring alternatives. [Jefferson Public Radio]
Goldwind wind farm (Photo: Pzavislak, Wikimedia Commons)

Goldwind wind farm in China (Photo: Pzavislak, Wikimedia Commons)

  • EPA chief Scott Pruitt staged a quiet visit to Massachusetts, along Federal Energy Regulatory Commission member Neal Chaterjee. The two toured the Northfield Mountain Generating Station pumped storage facility in Northfield. The visit was one day before FERC finalized new rules to benefit energy storage facilities. [MassLive.com]
  • Australia currently mines the majority of the world’s lithium and also mines all of the minerals needed to make batteries on its home soil, but a report by Future Smart Strategies warns that a failure to look beyond this natural advantage, to opportunities that lie further down the supply chain, could cost the nation dearly. [CleanTechnica]
  • After Massachusetts chose a $950 million project headed by Maine utility Central Maine Power as its backup option to bring Canadian power to their state, Maine Gov Paul LePage’s energy czar said his boss would “push this right through” the rest of the permitting process that is handled by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection. [Maine Public]
  • With state officials eyeing $56 billion of wind farm projects off the American coastline, developers are worried the turbines will need to be stamped with a big “Made in the USA.” Most are made in Europe, but the states in the Northeast that are jumping into wind power are betting they can create their own wind turbine industry. [WatertownDailyTimes.com]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

February 18 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

February 17 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Clean energy – not natural gas – drove decarbonization in 2017” • Last year, for the first time, power sector emissions were reduced more by energy conservation and renewable energy than switching from coal to natural gas. This happened despite all Trump administration and fossil fuels industry attempts to limit clean energy. [Environmental Defense Fund]
US wind farm

US wind farm

  • According to project developer Statoil, the world’s first floating wind farm, Hywind Scotland, has been generating electricity at a level that surpasses expectations through its first three full months of production. Where bottom-fixed offshore wind farms operate at 45% to 60% of rated capacity, Hywind Scotland has averaged 65%. [CleanTechnica]
  • Despite the current Presidential regime’s attempts to defend the coal industry, the US is home to a utility breaking world records for renewable energy development. With 47 GW of renewable capacity already built, NextEra plans to double its rate of install in the next few years, aiming for a total of 10.1 to 16.5 GW for the 2017-2020 period. [CleanTechnica]
  • Massachusetts regulators said that Central Maine Power’s New England Clean Energy Connect will bring power from Canada to the Bay State if Eversource does not resolve its Northern Pass permitting problems in New Hampshire by March 27. The 1,200-MW New England Clean Energy Connect would run through 145 miles of western Maine. [MassLive.com]
  • EDF pledged to step up its renewable energy efforts as its sliding nuclear business sees revenues fall. The French energy giant’s annual results for 2017 show a 16% drop in earnings before interest and tax. Earnings in the UK fell by around a third as the company received lower prices than it expected for its nuclear power output. [Energy Live News]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

February 17 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times