July 28 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Vermont Governor Phil Scott issued a statement in support of proposals to supply Massachusetts with 1,000 MW of clean power via the TDI New England Clean Power Link. The TDI project would run from the Canadian border and under Lake Champlain for nearly a hundred miles before connecting to the New England grid in Ludlow. [Vermont Biz]
Lake Champlain (Aaron danielg, Wikimedia Commons)

Lake Champlain (Aaron danielg, Wikimedia Commons)

  • Royal Dutch Shell is bracing for a peak in oil demand. Shell boss Ben Van Beurden said the oil major had changed its company mindset to a “lower forever” oil price environment and is focusing on being “fit for the forties,” in reference to the faltering oil price, which has struggled to remain above the $50 a barrel mark. [Telegraph.co.uk]
  • With climate change, water scarcity and warmth could begin impacting European electricity generation as soon as 2030, causing production to decrease or to stop altogether, according to a study, published in the journal Nature. It concludes that traditional generation sources such as coal, gas, and nuclear will be increasingly vulnerable. [CleanTechnica]
  • Kansas is the fifth state to have at least 5000 MW of wind power capacity installed. The state is behind California, Oklahoma, Iowa and Texas, which has a capacity of a whopping 21,000 MW. Kansans get 30% of their power from wind and solar. The state now has enough wind power capacity to supply 1.5 million average homes. [KMUW]
  • US wind-power projects under construction or in advanced development in the second quarter are up 40% from the same quarter last year, according to the American Wind Energy Association. In April through June, 29 wind projects, for a total capacity of 3,841 MW, either began construction or entered advanced development. [Windpower Engineering]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

July 28 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

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