May 26 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • GTM Research projects 24¢/W solar panels and utility scale fixed-tilt systems costing 70¢/W by 2022. This would open up new possibilities for ultra-cheap power. The cost of electricity from such systems could fall to 1.5¢/kWh or lower. Trump’s solar panel tariffs may delay that goal, but they are set to phase out by 2022. [pv magazine International]
Solar array (Soltec image)

Solar array (Soltec image)

  • Two utilities, Vistra Energy Corp and Dominion Energy Inc, which serve about 5.5 million electricity customers in more than a dozen US states, both say they are done building combined-cycle natural gas-fired power plants. Instead, they are building large solar plants, which offer them plentiful and inexpensive electricity. [Reuters]
  • General Electric’s shares plunged 7% on May 23, their worst one-day decline since an 8.4% slide in April 2009. The economic health of GE and other the large power equipment makers may hinge on how utilities handle the expected wave of power plant retirements. Mitsubishi said it expects orders for steam and gas turbines to run dry by 2020. [Utility Dive]
  • A partnership between Honda Motor and Chinese battery conglomerate Contemporary Amperex Technology to develop a next-generation electric vehicle for the motor company with at least 300 km (186 miles) of range. Based on the Honda Fit, the car would have a price of just over $18,000, and it is expected to be available in 2020. [CleanTechnica]
  • The New Orleans City Council signed off on an investigation into the use of paid actors to support an Entergy plan for a new power plant in New Orleans East. The council vote to release a request for proposals for a third-party consultant to look into the matter was unanimous. The council also plans to look into earlier similar incidents. [The Advocate]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

May 26 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

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May 26 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • GTM Research projects 24¢/W solar panels and utility scale fixed-tilt systems costing 70¢/W by 2022. This would open up new possibilities for ultra-cheap power. The cost of electricity from such systems could fall to 1.5¢/kWh or lower. Trump’s solar panel tariffs may delay that goal, but they are set to phase out by 2022. [pv magazine International]
Solar array (Soltec image)

Solar array (Soltec image)

  • Two utilities, Vistra Energy Corp and Dominion Energy Inc, which serve about 5.5 million electricity customers in more than a dozen US states, both say they are done building combined-cycle natural gas-fired power plants. Instead, they are building large solar plants, which offer them plentiful and inexpensive electricity. [Reuters]
  • General Electric’s shares plunged 7% on May 23, their worst one-day decline since an 8.4% slide in April 2009. The economic health of GE and other the large power equipment makers may hinge on how utilities handle the expected wave of power plant retirements. Mitsubishi said it expects orders for steam and gas turbines to run dry by 2020. [Utility Dive]
  • A partnership between Honda Motor and Chinese battery conglomerate Contemporary Amperex Technology to develop a next-generation electric vehicle for the motor company with at least 300 km (186 miles) of range. Based on the Honda Fit, the car would have a price of just over $18,000, and it is expected to be available in 2020. [CleanTechnica]
  • The New Orleans City Council signed off on an investigation into the use of paid actors to support an Entergy plan for a new power plant in New Orleans East. The council vote to release a request for proposals for a third-party consultant to look into the matter was unanimous. The council also plans to look into earlier similar incidents. [The Advocate]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

May 26 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

May 25 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • The future of Exelon’s unprofitable Three Mile Island nuclear power plant looks even bleaker. The company said it failed at an annual auction for the future electricity sales. Exelon’s Dresden and Byron plants, both in Illinois, also failed in the 2021-2022 auction to supply the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest regional power grid. [StateImpact Pennsylvania]
Three Mile Island nuclear plant (US DOE image)

Three Mile Island nuclear plant (US DOE image)

  • New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed legislation that will move the state’s electricity mix to 50% renewable by 2030 and codifies the largest state commitment to offshore wind power. State law now commits the state of New Jersey to develop 3,500 MW of offshore wind, enough to power over one million average homes. [Windpower Engineering]
  • ESS Inc, US maker of the only flow battery with a chemistry based on iron and saltwater electrolytes, is making its first move into the Brazilian energy storage market. A 50-kW/400-kWh test unit will be deployed and integrated together with 100 kW of PV, allowing for several hours of energy storage of onsite generated electricity. [Energy Storage News]
  • South Australia will push ahead with a plan to install Tesla battery systems in 50,000 homes. The new state government is committed to the pro-battery agenda of its predecessor. The deal to create what is being called the world’s largest virtual power plant appears to have survived political changes from Labor to Liberal dominance. [ABC Online]
  • New Hampshire regulators voted unanimously not to give Eversource a new hearing for its Northern Pass power line proposal. The case is likely to go to the state’s Supreme Court. Eversource argued the state Site Evaluation Committee failed to consider details of the power line proposal before denying its permit. [New Hampshire Public Radio]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

May 25 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

May 25 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • The future of Exelon’s unprofitable Three Mile Island nuclear power plant looks even bleaker. The company said it failed at an annual auction for the future electricity sales. Exelon’s Dresden and Byron plants, both in Illinois, also failed in the 2021-2022 auction to supply the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest regional power grid. [StateImpact Pennsylvania]
Three Mile Island nuclear plant (US DOE image)

Three Mile Island nuclear plant (US DOE image)

  • New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed legislation that will move the state’s electricity mix to 50% renewable by 2030 and codifies the largest state commitment to offshore wind power. State law now commits the state of New Jersey to develop 3,500 MW of offshore wind, enough to power over one million average homes. [Windpower Engineering]
  • ESS Inc, US maker of the only flow battery with a chemistry based on iron and saltwater electrolytes, is making its first move into the Brazilian energy storage market. A 50-kW/400-kWh test unit will be deployed and integrated together with 100 kW of PV, allowing for several hours of energy storage of onsite generated electricity. [Energy Storage News]
  • South Australia will push ahead with a plan to install Tesla battery systems in 50,000 homes. The new state government is committed to the pro-battery agenda of its predecessor. The deal to create what is being called the world’s largest virtual power plant appears to have survived political changes from Labor to Liberal dominance. [ABC Online]
  • New Hampshire regulators voted unanimously not to give Eversource a new hearing for its Northern Pass power line proposal. The case is likely to go to the state’s Supreme Court. Eversource argued the state Site Evaluation Committee failed to consider details of the power line proposal before denying its permit. [New Hampshire Public Radio]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

May 25 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

May 24 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • The state of Rhode Island has selected Deepwater Wind, the Providence company that built the nation’s first offshore wind farm, to develop a 400-MW proposal in federal waters far off the coast that would be more than 10 times the size of the Block Island demonstration project. Gov Gina Raimondo announced the surprise decision. [The Providence Journal]
Block Island wind farm

Block Island wind farm

  • Massachusetts made a big step forward in its push to rely more on renewable energy by agreeing to purchase 800 MW of offshore wind power from Vineyard Wind. The New Bedford-based company was one of three competing for the contract. The proposed farm is poised to become the largest offshore wind farm in the country. [WCAI]
  • A Vermont food company, whose products are on store shelves throughout New England, is now making its coffee using an emerging power source that’s gentler on the environment. The coffee beans look the same, dark brown as always, but the energy that now fuels operations at the Vermont Coffee Company in Middlebury is green. [NECN]
  • A new Bloomberg New Energy Finance report focused on electric buses forecasts a surge in electric bus sales to 84% of global new bus sales by 2030. The report forecasts that electric cars will follow, but at a slower pace, reaching 28% of new car sales in 2030. But the forecasts highlight the risk of nearly single-sourced cobalt. [CleanTechnica]
  • The City of Norman, Oklahoma, committed to transition to 100% clean and renewable energy, according to the Sierra Club, which said Norman is the first city in Oklahoma to make the commitment. Norman’s City Council unanimously adopted the resolution, committing the city to use 100% clean energy for electricity by 2035. [Solar Industry]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

May 24 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

May 24 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • The state of Rhode Island has selected Deepwater Wind, the Providence company that built the nation’s first offshore wind farm, to develop a 400-MW proposal in federal waters far off the coast that would be more than 10 times the size of the Block Island demonstration project. Gov Gina Raimondo announced the surprise decision. [The Providence Journal]
Block Island wind farm

Block Island wind farm

  • Massachusetts made a big step forward in its push to rely more on renewable energy by agreeing to purchase 800 MW of offshore wind power from Vineyard Wind. The New Bedford-based company was one of three competing for the contract. The proposed farm is poised to become the largest offshore wind farm in the country. [WCAI]
  • A Vermont food company, whose products are on store shelves throughout New England, is now making its coffee using an emerging power source that’s gentler on the environment. The coffee beans look the same, dark brown as always, but the energy that now fuels operations at the Vermont Coffee Company in Middlebury is green. [NECN]
  • A new Bloomberg New Energy Finance report focused on electric buses forecasts a surge in electric bus sales to 84% of global new bus sales by 2030. The report forecasts that electric cars will follow, but at a slower pace, reaching 28% of new car sales in 2030. But the forecasts highlight the risk of nearly single-sourced cobalt. [CleanTechnica]
  • The City of Norman, Oklahoma, committed to transition to 100% clean and renewable energy, according to the Sierra Club, which said Norman is the first city in Oklahoma to make the commitment. Norman’s City Council unanimously adopted the resolution, committing the city to use 100% clean energy for electricity by 2035. [Solar Industry]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

May 24 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

May 23 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • The American Wind Energy Association says that the number of contracts signed for wind power projects hit a record of 3,500 MW in the first quarter of 2018, a possible predictor of a strong year for wind power. Among the news items it cited was an announcement by PacifiCorp of a plan for a $2 billion wind farm in Wyoming. [Energy Manager Today]
Wind farm

Wind farm

  • The Netherlands has announced that it will ban the use of coal for electricity generation from 2030 onwards, and that the two oldest plants must close by the end of 2024. Germany utility company RWE has deemed the plan “ill judged.” But according to Carbon Tracker, over half of all European coal-burning power plants are losing money. [CleanTechnica]
  • The Oregon Public Utility Commission has declined to acknowledge a short list of four Wyoming wind power projects from a request for proposals by PacifiCorp, saying the process was not sufficiently competitive. PacifiCorp said it will move ahead with the $3.5 billion wind and transmission expansion anyway. [Portland Business Journal]
  • In its Corporate Responsibility Report, Xcel Energy announced it cut carbon emissions 35%, putting itself on track to reach its ambitious goal of reducing carbon emissions 60% by 2030 from 2005 levels. This means that Xcel Energy is a step closer to achieving one of the most aggressive carbon-reduction goals in the industry. [POWER magazine]
  • Following on the heels of a deal for 500 electric refuse trucks in Shenzhen a few days ago, BYD announced another deal for an impressive 200 electric refuse trucks in Indaiatuba, Brazil. The electric refuse weigh in at 21 metric tons when fully loaded. The first twenty of the trucks will be delivered in September, and the rest over 5 years. [CleanTechnica]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

May 23 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times