October 17 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Increasing amounts of renewable energy has sparked worries in the federal government over grid reliability and resilience. But some grid operators are successfully demonstrating that large amounts of intermittent resources can be integrated and sustain system reliability as successfully as, for example, a natural gas plant. [Utility Dive]
Large solar array in the Southwest (Credit: Array Technologies Inc)

Large solar array in the Southwest (Credit: Array Technologies Inc)

  • Arizona had faced some of the nation’s steepest emissions cuts under the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. But Arizona utilities and regulators said they plan to continue working toward the lower carbon emission goals that had been set in the plan, even though EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said this week that the agency is scrapping the program. [Arizona Daily Sun]
  • Ireland and Northern Ireland’s integrated electricity system could save €19 million a year from 2019-20 by using battery-based energy storage to stabilize the grid, according to a report by Queen’s University Belfast. It showed that 360 MW of battery storage could provide the same fast frequency response as 3 GW of conventional power. [reNews]
  • After months of internal controversy, the clean energy target favored by Australian chief scientist Alan Finkel was dumped by the government in favor of a new “national energy guarantee,” which will impose both reliability guarantees and emissions reduction guarantees on retailers and some large energy users. Opposition is fierce. [The Guardian]
  • The solar power industry is booming across Trump country, fueled by falling development costs and the subsidies for solar and wind power, which many Republicans in Congress continue to support. With falling development costs, solar firms now see strong prospects in conservative states with no clean energy mandates. [Reuters]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 17 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

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October 17 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Increasing amounts of renewable energy has sparked worries in the federal government over grid reliability and resilience. But some grid operators are successfully demonstrating that large amounts of intermittent resources can be integrated and sustain system reliability as successfully as, for example, a natural gas plant. [Utility Dive]
Large solar array in the Southwest (Credit: Array Technologies Inc)

Large solar array in the Southwest (Credit: Array Technologies Inc)

  • Arizona had faced some of the nation’s steepest emissions cuts under the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. But Arizona utilities and regulators said they plan to continue working toward the lower carbon emission goals that had been set in the plan, even though EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said this week that the agency is scrapping the program. [Arizona Daily Sun]
  • Ireland and Northern Ireland’s integrated electricity system could save €19 million a year from 2019-20 by using battery-based energy storage to stabilize the grid, according to a report by Queen’s University Belfast. It showed that 360 MW of battery storage could provide the same fast frequency response as 3 GW of conventional power. [reNews]
  • After months of internal controversy, the clean energy target favored by Australian chief scientist Alan Finkel was dumped by the government in favor of a new “national energy guarantee,” which will impose both reliability guarantees and emissions reduction guarantees on retailers and some large energy users. Opposition is fierce. [The Guardian]
  • The solar power industry is booming across Trump country, fueled by falling development costs and the subsidies for solar and wind power, which many Republicans in Congress continue to support. With falling development costs, solar firms now see strong prospects in conservative states with no clean energy mandates. [Reuters]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 17 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

October 16 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Wind technician is the fastest growing occupation in the US. As utilities rapidly increase the amount of power they get from wind farms, workers who climb hundreds of feet to keep turbines running smoothly are in high demand. Students in Minnesota’s wind power training programs sometimes get jobs before they graduate. [Minneapolis Star Tribune]
Inside the nacelle of a Vestas turbine (Glen Stubbe | Star Tribune)

Inside the nacelle of a Vestas turbine (Glen Stubbe | Star Tribune)

  • The news of Luminant closing coal-burning power plants in Texas boosts the expected capacity of 2018 power plant closures to over 13,600 MW, or a whopping 79% more than the known closures for this year. It is not a record high (nearly 18,000 MW went offline in 2015), but it is clear that Trump administration claims that it will save coal are foundering. [Engadget]
  • The France-based energy giant Total, along with partner energy group Erg, is now looking to expedite the sale of its Italian gas/petrol station network, TotalErg, due to investor worries about the impact of the growing electric vehicle market. TotalErg operates around 2,600 gas/petrol service stations throughout Italy. [CleanTechnica]
  • “The war on coal is over. Coal lost.” • According to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, many old American coal power plants are being retired or converted to natural gas, and new coal power plants aren’t being built because they’ve become more expensive than natural gas, wind, and solar energy. [The Guardian]
  • Australia’s competition watchdog said the country’s residential electricity price rise, 63% over inflation during the past decade, was mainly due to higher network costs. Transmission “poles and wires” took up 48% of a household bill, 22% was wholesale costs, 16% was retail and other costs, 8% was retail margins, and 7% was Green schemes. [The Guardian]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 16 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

October 16 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Wind technician is the fastest growing occupation in the US. As utilities rapidly increase the amount of power they get from wind farms, workers who climb hundreds of feet to keep turbines running smoothly are in high demand. Students in Minnesota’s wind power training programs sometimes get jobs before they graduate. [Minneapolis Star Tribune]
Inside the nacelle of a Vestas turbine (Glen Stubbe | Star Tribune)

Inside the nacelle of a Vestas turbine (Glen Stubbe | Star Tribune)

  • The news of Luminant closing coal-burning power plants in Texas boosts the expected capacity of 2018 power plant closures to over 13,600 MW, or a whopping 79% more than the known closures for this year. It is not a record high (nearly 18,000 MW went offline in 2015), but it is clear that Trump administration claims that it will save coal are foundering. [Engadget]
  • The France-based energy giant Total, along with partner energy group Erg, is now looking to expedite the sale of its Italian gas/petrol station network, TotalErg, due to investor worries about the impact of the growing electric vehicle market. TotalErg operates around 2,600 gas/petrol service stations throughout Italy. [CleanTechnica]
  • “The war on coal is over. Coal lost.” • According to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, many old American coal power plants are being retired or converted to natural gas, and new coal power plants aren’t being built because they’ve become more expensive than natural gas, wind, and solar energy. [The Guardian]
  • Australia’s competition watchdog said the country’s residential electricity price rise, 63% over inflation during the past decade, was mainly due to higher network costs. Transmission “poles and wires” took up 48% of a household bill, 22% was wholesale costs, 16% was retail and other costs, 8% was retail margins, and 7% was Green schemes. [The Guardian]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 16 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

October 15 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Clean energy provides jobs boom in state” • Clean Energy Economy Minnesota released an analysis showing that Minnesota gained 2892 clean energy jobs over the last year, a growth rate almost four times faster than the rest of the economy. The clean energy sector now employs over 57,000 people across the state. [St. Cloud Times]
Solar array in Ramsey, Minnesota seeded with a pollinator habitat by Prairie Restorations, Inc (Photo: Courtesy of PRI)

Solar array seeded with a pollinator habitat by Prairie Restorations, Inc (Photo: Courtesy of PRI)

  • “Zombie oil” that ought to stay in the ground is kept alive thanks to federal and state governments feeding it billions of dollars, a study shows. The subsidies are not cash handouts. They’re a mix of tax breaks, tax credits, and regulations that forego government revenue, transfer liability, or provide services at below-market rates. [Motherboard en_us]
  • A futuristic car that not only uses the sun as power but supplies energy back to the grid has been hailed as “the future” as the annual World Solar Challenge wrapped up in Australia. The Dutch entrant, Nuna 9, won the race for the third-straight time, crossing the finish line after travelling at an average speed of 81.2 kmh (55.5 mph). [The Guardian]
  • EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s move to roll back the Clean Power Plan will have little impact in Oregon. The economics of power generation left coal behind some time ago. Consumer demand for cleaner sources of power, and government insistence on them, are pushing utilities to investment more in renewable power sources. [Bend Bulletin]
  • Few people ever venture into data centers, places with massive series of servers kept in buildings like giant warehouses. But in Stockholm, anyone who goes inside one of these information labyrinths will discover that they’re not just housing data. All the heat they give off is helping to warm homes in the city of over 900,000 people. [BBC]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 15 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

October 15 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Clean energy provides jobs boom in state” • Clean Energy Economy Minnesota released an analysis showing that Minnesota gained 2892 clean energy jobs over the last year, a growth rate almost four times faster than the rest of the economy. The clean energy sector now employs over 57,000 people across the state. [St. Cloud Times]
Solar array in Ramsey, Minnesota seeded with a pollinator habitat by Prairie Restorations, Inc (Photo: Courtesy of PRI)

Solar array seeded with a pollinator habitat by Prairie Restorations, Inc (Photo: Courtesy of PRI)

  • “Zombie oil” that ought to stay in the ground is kept alive thanks to federal and state governments feeding it billions of dollars, a study shows. The subsidies are not cash handouts. They’re a mix of tax breaks, tax credits, and regulations that forego government revenue, transfer liability, or provide services at below-market rates. [Motherboard en_us]
  • A futuristic car that not only uses the sun as power but supplies energy back to the grid has been hailed as “the future” as the annual World Solar Challenge wrapped up in Australia. The Dutch entrant, Nuna 9, won the race for the third-straight time, crossing the finish line after travelling at an average speed of 81.2 kmh (55.5 mph). [The Guardian]
  • EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s move to roll back the Clean Power Plan will have little impact in Oregon. The economics of power generation left coal behind some time ago. Consumer demand for cleaner sources of power, and government insistence on them, are pushing utilities to investment more in renewable power sources. [Bend Bulletin]
  • Few people ever venture into data centers, places with massive series of servers kept in buildings like giant warehouses. But in Stockholm, anyone who goes inside one of these information labyrinths will discover that they’re not just housing data. All the heat they give off is helping to warm homes in the city of over 900,000 people. [BBC]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 15 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

Certified Passive House Designer/Consultant (CPHD/C) Training: Scholarships Available

$500 SCHOLARSHIP available to the first 10 participants courtesy of our sponsor, Green Mountain Power

DATE: Mon, Nov 13  –  Fri, Nov 17, 2017 9 am – 5 pm

LOCATION: Green Mountain Power, Montpelier, VT 

NAPHN’s Certified Passive House Designer/Consultant course is the premier training program for low-energy, net zero and Passive House building professionals. This course is specifically designed to teach the international Passive House Standard to American professionals making Passive Houses in the U.S. construction industry.

5 days of in-class instruction, and additional e-learning modules. On successfully passing the exam, participants will receive a five year registration as an internationally accredited Certified Passive House Designer or Consultant.

This course is for all building professionals: architects, MEP and structural engineers, builders and construction managers working in the design and construction of new build and retrofit Passive House buildings.

Provided in collaboration with the Passive House Academy (PHA), the Passive House Institute (PHI), and Vermont Passive House, and is accredited by the AIA for 35 LUs.

The first 10 participants will each receive  $500 IN TUITION ASSISTANCE. Click HERE for Registration Information and details.  www.PHAUSVT.org

Certified Passive House Designer/Consultant (CPHD/C) Training: Scholarships Available posted first on Green Energy Times