Tesla wins contract to supply Powerpacks at world’s first solar+wind+storage project

re-posted from https://electrek.co. article by Fred Blambert

Last month, it was revealed that Tesla is working with world’s largest wind-turbine maker, Vestas, to deploy batteries at their wind farms.

Now Tesla won its first contract with the company and as it turns out, it’s not only for a wind farm but actually the first solar+wind+energy storage project in the world.

Australia’s Windlab is managing the $160 million project at the Kennedy Energy Park hybrid renewable energy site in North Queensland.

They announced today that they secured financing from the Clean Energy Finance Corporation and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and they selected Vestas, Tesla, and Quanta for the project. They describe the new contract:

“Kennedy will consist of 43.2MW Wind, 15MW AC, single axis tracking Solar and 4MWh of Li Ion battery storage. The project will use twelve Vestas V136, 3.6MW turbines at a hub height of 132metres; the largest wind turbines yet to be deployed in Australia. The Li Ion storage will be provided by Tesla. The project will be constructed under a joint construction contract managed by Vestas and Quanta. The project will take a little over 12 months to construct and is expected to be fully operational before the end of 2018. The project will create more than 100 local jobs during construction.”

They believe this system will supply energy for more than 35,000 average Australian homes and it will serve as a demonstration of combining wind, solar and energy storage at the local level.

Roger Price, Windlab’s Executive Chairman and CEO, commented:

“We believe Kennedy Energy Park will demonstrate how effectively wind, solar and storage can be combined to provide low cost, reliable and clean energy for Australia’s future. The broader adoption of projects like Kennedy can address the recommendations of the Finkel review and ensure that Australia can more than meet its Paris Commitments while putting downward pressure on energy prices”.

It’s actually only one of several phases for what they hope will be 1,200MW of capacity at the Kennedy Energy Park.

4 MWh of batteries is actually a relatively small project for Tesla, especially when considering the massive new 100 MW/129 MWh Powerpack system that they are currently installing in Australia.

But the combination of solar and wind is the interesting part here. If successful, they could end up scaling the energy storage capacity with the wind and solar capacity, which is expected to be quite significant at this site.

Queensland has strong winds, but wind generation in the region is biased towards the late afternoon, which is why it makes sense to add storage and solar to the mix.

 

Tesla wins contract to supply Powerpacks at world’s first solar+wind+storage project posted first on Green Energy Times

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October 20 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Pollution’s Annual Price Tag? $4.6 Trillion and 9 Million Dead” Pollution in all its forms killed 9 million people in 2015 and, by one measure, led to economic damage of $4.6 trillion, according to a new estimate by medical researchers who hope to put the health costs of toxic air, water and soil higher on the global agenda. [Yahoo News]
Inner Mongolian landscape (Photo: Kevin Frayer | Getty Images)

Inner Mongolian landscape (Photo: Kevin Frayer | Getty Images)

  • Assembly of the ITER reactor, a nuclear fusion project costing €20 billion ($24 billion), will begin in France in May of 2018. But with wind-farm developers starting to promise subsidy-free power by 2025 and electricity demand stagnating, even the project’s supporters are asking whether ITER will ever make sense. [The Edge Markets MY]
  • Green Mountain Power wants to build Vermont’s second commercial renewable energy storage battery near its solar array in Panton. The $3 million Tesla battery will store about 1 MW of power which will come off of the solar array nearby. The new battery will allow GMP to store renewable energy for helping meet peak grid demand. [Vermont Public Radio]
  • An ambitious renewable energy target of 40% by 2025 has been given the green light by Victoria’s parliament. The legislation, which also locks in a 25% target by 2020, passed the state’s upper house on Friday afternoon. Government modelling shows the target will cut the average Victorian household power bill by $30 a year. [SBS]
  • Eight former members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, including five former chairmen, have filed a bluntly worded letter with the commission opposing Perry’s proposal that would give coal and nuclear plants credit for resilience to improve their chance of beating solar, wind and natural gas competitors. [The Columbian]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 20 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

Tesla wins contract to supply Powerpacks at world’s first solar+wind+storage project

re-posted from https://electrek.co. article by Fred Blambert

Last month, it was revealed that Tesla is working with world’s largest wind-turbine maker, Vestas, to deploy batteries at their wind farms.

Now Tesla won its first contract with the company and as it turns out, it’s not only for a wind farm but actually the first solar+wind+energy storage project in the world.

Australia’s Windlab is managing the $160 million project at the Kennedy Energy Park hybrid renewable energy site in North Queensland.

They announced today that they secured financing from the Clean Energy Finance Corporation and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and they selected Vestas, Tesla, and Quanta for the project. They describe the new contract:

“Kennedy will consist of 43.2MW Wind, 15MW AC, single axis tracking Solar and 4MWh of Li Ion battery storage. The project will use twelve Vestas V136, 3.6MW turbines at a hub height of 132metres; the largest wind turbines yet to be deployed in Australia. The Li Ion storage will be provided by Tesla. The project will be constructed under a joint construction contract managed by Vestas and Quanta. The project will take a little over 12 months to construct and is expected to be fully operational before the end of 2018. The project will create more than 100 local jobs during construction.”

They believe this system will supply energy for more than 35,000 average Australian homes and it will serve as a demonstration of combining wind, solar and energy storage at the local level.

Roger Price, Windlab’s Executive Chairman and CEO, commented:

“We believe Kennedy Energy Park will demonstrate how effectively wind, solar and storage can be combined to provide low cost, reliable and clean energy for Australia’s future. The broader adoption of projects like Kennedy can address the recommendations of the Finkel review and ensure that Australia can more than meet its Paris Commitments while putting downward pressure on energy prices”.

It’s actually only one of several phases for what they hope will be 1,200MW of capacity at the Kennedy Energy Park.

4 MWh of batteries is actually a relatively small project for Tesla, especially when considering the massive new 100 MW/129 MWh Powerpack system that they are currently installing in Australia.

But the combination of solar and wind is the interesting part here. If successful, they could end up scaling the energy storage capacity with the wind and solar capacity, which is expected to be quite significant at this site.

Queensland has strong winds, but wind generation in the region is biased towards the late afternoon, which is why it makes sense to add storage and solar to the mix.

 

Tesla wins contract to supply Powerpacks at world’s first solar+wind+storage project posted first on Green Energy Times

October 20 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Pollution’s Annual Price Tag? $4.6 Trillion and 9 Million Dead” Pollution in all its forms killed 9 million people in 2015 and, by one measure, led to economic damage of $4.6 trillion, according to a new estimate by medical researchers who hope to put the health costs of toxic air, water and soil higher on the global agenda. [Yahoo News]
Inner Mongolian landscape (Photo: Kevin Frayer | Getty Images)

Inner Mongolian landscape (Photo: Kevin Frayer | Getty Images)

  • Assembly of the ITER reactor, a nuclear fusion project costing €20 billion ($24 billion), will begin in France in May of 2018. But with wind-farm developers starting to promise subsidy-free power by 2025 and electricity demand stagnating, even the project’s supporters are asking whether ITER will ever make sense. [The Edge Markets MY]
  • Green Mountain Power wants to build Vermont’s second commercial renewable energy storage battery near its solar array in Panton. The $3 million Tesla battery will store about 1 MW of power which will come off of the solar array nearby. The new battery will allow GMP to store renewable energy for helping meet peak grid demand. [Vermont Public Radio]
  • An ambitious renewable energy target of 40% by 2025 has been given the green light by Victoria’s parliament. The legislation, which also locks in a 25% target by 2020, passed the state’s upper house on Friday afternoon. Government modelling shows the target will cut the average Victorian household power bill by $30 a year. [SBS]
  • Eight former members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, including five former chairmen, have filed a bluntly worded letter with the commission opposing Perry’s proposal that would give coal and nuclear plants credit for resilience to improve their chance of beating solar, wind and natural gas competitors. [The Columbian]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 20 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

October 19 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “A more climate-resilient Puerto Rico?” • As Puerto Rico faces a devastating humanitarian crisis, an emerging viewpoint is that the island should think twice about restoring its electrical system as it’s existed in the past. Instead, this reasoning goes, Puerto Rico should plan for more resilient, distributed infrastructure. [Yale Climate Connections]
Trees and power lines downed by Hurricane Maria (Photo: SSgt.Michelle Y Alvarez-Rea, USAF)

Trees and power lines downed by Hurricane Maria (Photo: SSgt Michelle Y Alvarez-Rea, USAF)

  • “What is electricity resilience worth to you?” • Power outages are a nuisance to some, an economic burden to others, and even lethal in some cases. It is impossible to place a price on electric resilience that could be applied to everyone. So it is crucial that customers know what power loss could cost them as they weigh needs for microgrids. [Microgrid Knowledge]
  • It’s known as the windscreen phenomenon. When you stop your car after a drive, there seem to be far fewer squashed insects than there used to be. Scientists have long suspected that insects are in dramatic decline, but new evidence confirms this. German research suggests flying insects have declined by more than 75% over almost 30 years. [BBC News]
  • About 1 million Americans are without running water. There are 3 million without power. “You wake up and it’s this mess as far as the eye can see,” one man said. One month after Hurricane Maria, these realities are starting to feel less like an emergency and more like the new way of life – a nightmarish loop that resets each day the sun rises. [CNN]
  • Target announced a new climate policy and goals to further environmental progress. Target’s new policy and goals align with those of the Science-Based Targets Initiative, as it aims to cut back on carbon emissions, minimize water use, produce more eco-friendly products and foster a more sustainable supply chain. [Sourcing Journal Online]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 19 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times

October 19 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “A more climate-resilient Puerto Rico?” • As Puerto Rico faces a devastating humanitarian crisis, an emerging viewpoint is that the island should think twice about restoring its electrical system as it’s existed in the past. Instead, this reasoning goes, Puerto Rico should plan for more resilient, distributed infrastructure. [Yale Climate Connections]
Trees and power lines downed by Hurricane Maria (Photo: SSgt.Michelle Y Alvarez-Rea, USAF)

Trees and power lines downed by Hurricane Maria (Photo: SSgt Michelle Y Alvarez-Rea, USAF)

  • “What is electricity resilience worth to you?” • Power outages are a nuisance to some, an economic burden to others, and even lethal in some cases. It is impossible to place a price on electric resilience that could be applied to everyone. So it is crucial that customers know what power loss could cost them as they weigh needs for microgrids. [Microgrid Knowledge]
  • It’s known as the windscreen phenomenon. When you stop your car after a drive, there seem to be far fewer squashed insects than there used to be. Scientists have long suspected that insects are in dramatic decline, but new evidence confirms this. German research suggests flying insects have declined by more than 75% over almost 30 years. [BBC News]
  • About 1 million Americans are without running water. There are 3 million without power. “You wake up and it’s this mess as far as the eye can see,” one man said. One month after Hurricane Maria, these realities are starting to feel less like an emergency and more like the new way of life – a nightmarish loop that resets each day the sun rises. [CNN]
  • Target announced a new climate policy and goals to further environmental progress. Target’s new policy and goals align with those of the Science-Based Targets Initiative, as it aims to cut back on carbon emissions, minimize water use, produce more eco-friendly products and foster a more sustainable supply chain. [Sourcing Journal Online]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

October 19 Green Energy News posted first on Green Energy Times